Transportation Policy Bibliography

Altshuler, Alan A., James P. Womack and John R. Pulcher. The Urban Transportation System: Politics and Policy Innovation. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1979, 558 p.

Examines transportation policy after world war II and makes recommendations based upon political feasibility of changes and the cost effectiveness of innovations. It discusses many innovations and programs that are now standard, e.g. carpooling, price disincentives, noise regulation, priorities for high occupancy vehicles, etc.

Anderson, Susan E. et al Towards the Future: the Promise of Intermodal and Multimodal Transportation Systems. College Station, TX: Texas Transportation Institute, 1995, 96p. NTIS order number is PB 95-240461XSP.

Views the Impact of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and the North American free Trade Agreement on transportation. Examines federal and state relations in intermodal trends, and the functions of Metropolitan Planning Organizations with the Houston, Texas area serving as an example. Partnering with the private sector and regulation case studies are given.

Banister, David and Kenneth Button; foreword by sir Christopher Foster. Transport in a Free Market Economy. London: Macmillan, 1991, 255p.

Covers deregulation of transportation with emphasis on U. S. airlines and a discussion of its comparative effect on European state-owned monopolies.

Banister, David, ed. Transport Policy and the Environment. New York: Routledge, 1998, 348p.

Analyzes research funded by the United Kingdom Economic and Social Research Council on Transport and the Environment. States the importance of influencing government policy. Quantifies the impact of transportation on the environment.

Bayliss, Brian T. Transport Policy and Planning. Washington, D. C. : World Bank, 1992, 68p. Available for purchase through NTIS as PB 92 208776XSP.

The World Bank generates a comprehensive transportation model that non-econometricians can use to test national strategies and policy decisions.

Berechman, Joseph. Public Transit Economics and Deregulation Policy. New York: North-Holland, 1993, 341p.

Detailed statistical analysis of deregulation potential of public transportation in U. S. and European cities leads the author to conclude that central city transit should be regulated, partial regulation in suburbs, small cities and rural areas and deregulation in intercity service.

Boske, Leigh B. Multimodal/Intermodal Transportation in the United States. Austin,TX.: LBJ School, University of Texas, 1998, 540p.

Looks at government transportation projects and policies that effect intermodal and multimodal movement of goods internationally with six case studies from Europe and Latin America. Analyses the effect of Common Market and NAFTA on government policy.

Bourne, Russell. Americans on the Move: a History of Waterways, Railways and Highways. Golden, CO.: Fulcrum Pub., 1995, 133p.

The effects of westward expansion and willingness of the population to resettle lead to the creation of a national system of roads, canals and railroads.

Brenner, Melvin A., James O. Leet, and Elihu Schott. Airline Deregulation. Westport, CT: Eno Foundation for Transportation, 1985, 148p.

An early study of the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 assesses its impact on industry structure, competition, domestic passenger fares, airline labor costs and operating efficiency.

Bullard, Robert D. and Glenn S. Johnson, eds. Just Transportation: Dismantling Race and Class Barriers to Mobility. Stony Creek, CT: New Society Publishers, 1997, 193p.

The importance of transportation to the opportunity to enjoy good employment, educational choices, access to municipal services and societal mobility are examined by a diverse group of contributors.

Button, Kenneth J. and Roger Stough, eds. Transport Policy. Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishers, 1998, 679 p.

Considers underlying objectives of transportation policy, institutions that define policy, actions that encourage users to adopt a policy, and options that meet policy objectives. National policy implementation, including former Soviet Union states, is also discussed.

Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Measuring and Valuing Transit Benefits and Disbenefits: Summary Report. Washington, D. C.: National Academy Press, 1996, 55p. NTIS order number is PB 97-180905XSP

Examines the intangible benefits and disadvantages that could be measured in new ways by transportation decision makers in deciding whether to do a project.

Camph, Donald H. How to Keep America Moving ISTEA): Transportation for the 21st Century. Report on the U. S. Department of Transportations's Outreach on Reauthorization of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act. Washington, D. C.: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1997, 58p. NTIS order number is PB 2000-104083XSP.

Provides a summary of major themes highlighted by participants in over one hundred focus groups from 40 states on the reauthorization of ISTEA.

Carlson, Daniel, Lisa Wormser and Cy Ulberg. At Road’s End: Transportation and Land Use Choices for Communities. Washington, DC: Island Press, 1995, 288p.

Covers the ISTEA effect of federal funding for more than just roads, e.g. foot, train, bus, and bike travel as well as cars.

Codd, Ned and Michael Walton. eds. Performance Measures and a Framework for Decision-making Under the National Transportation System. College Station, TX.: Texas Transportation Institute, 1995, 54p. NTIS order number is PB 95-274510. Also appears as a paper in Transportation Research Record No. 1518, Transportation Planning Applications.

Proposes that DOT pursue the goal of maximizing the efficiency and effectiveness of the national transportation network by designing a National Transportation System that can be monitored by performance measures.

Codd, Ned and Michael Walton. Performance Measures, Data Acquisition and Performance Evaluation under the National Transportation System. College Station, TX.: Southwest Region University Transportation Center, Texas Transportation Institute, 1996, 98p. NTIS Order number is PB 97 105019.

Discusses transportation performance measures that are intermodal, user oriented and capable of tracking economic, environmental and social results in the National Transportation System. Data samples are given for various measures as well as discussion of problems in acquiring and applying data.

Cole, Leon M. Economizing Transportation Responsibilities in the Federal Government. Washington, D. C.: Congressional Research Service, the Library of Congress, 1993, 49p. CRS Report No. 93-678E.

Cole, Stuart. Applied Transport Economics: Policy, Management and Decision Making. 2nd ed. London: Kogan Page, 1998, 464p.

A British textbook, it examines decision making techniques with an emphasis on fares policy and transport investment.

Dean, Alan L. Organization and Management of the Department of Transportation: a Background Paper. Washington, DC: National Academy of Public Administration, 1991, 44p.

Prepared for Secretary of Transportation Samuel Skinner, it is a history of DOT that examines the initial DOT organization, management structure and changes that occurred in the ensuing two decades. Topics include management concepts, personnel, the structure of the Office of the Secretary and the department as a whole and cross-modal functions.

Dempsey, Paul S. Social and Economic Consequences of Deregulation: the Transportation Industry in Transition. New York: Qurom Books, 1989, 277p.

Intrastate transportation and deregulation at the state level are the focus along with a discussion of economic deregulation. Includes industries other than transportation such as banking, telecommunications, oil and gas.

Dobbin, Frank. Forging Industrial Policy: the United States, Britain, and France in the Railway Age. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994, 262p.  

Dunn, James A., Jr., Driving Forces: the Automobile, Its Enemies and the Politics of Mobility. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 1998, 230p.

Examines major policy changes to regulate, tax and provide greater controls over automobile use from the viewpoint of an auto user. Advocates the benefits of automobile usage while supporting policies that don’t hurt the environment or deter better energy use.

Eno Transportation Foundation. National Transportation Organizations: Their Roles in the Policy Development and Implementation. Washington, DC: Eno Transportation Foundation, 1998, 97p.

The stakeholders of federal transportation policy are discussed as well as their positions and roles in making policy. Lists and directories are provided.

Estache, Antonio and Gines de Rus, eds. Privatization and Regulation of Transport Infrastructure: Guidelines for Policymakers and Regulators. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2000, 316p.

Covers economic theories and trends in privatization and regulation of airports, highways, ports and railroads.

Forkenbrock, David J. and Lisa A. Schweitzer. Environmental Justice and Transportation Investment Policy. Iowa City, IO: University of Iowa, Public Policy Center, 1997,106p.

Interstate 63 in Waterloo, Iowa was used to test possible indicators of economic, social and environmental impacts of transportation projects on low-income or minority populations.

Garrett, Mark. Transportation Planning on Trial: the Clean Air Act and Travel Forecasting. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1996, 232p.

Studies the effects of the Clean Air Act of 1990 and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 on the legal requirements facing regional transportation planners in their work. Court decisions concerning these Acts are discussed.

Geerlings, Harry. Meeting the Challenge of Sustainable Mobility: the Role of Technological Innovations. Berlin, Germany and New York: Springer, 1999, 262p.

Maglev and fuel cell technology are featured as examples of the impact of research and development on transportation. The environment is a factor in implementing technology as well as thinking out a strategy before beginning development of large scale transportation technologies.

Gomez-Ibanez, Jose A. , William B. Tye and Clifford Winston, eds. Essays in Transportation Economics and Policy: a Handbook in Honor of John R. Meyer. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 1999, 577p.

Papers honoring John Meyer, a leading transportation economist, were collected from a 1997 conference and organized here into four parts: Techniques of Transportation Analysis; the Automobile in Society; the Urban transportation Problem; and the Economics of Commercial Transportation safety.

Gordon, Deborah. Steering a New Course: Transportation, Energy and the Environment. Washington, DC: Island Press, 1991, 244p. Available from NTIS as ISLAND 0035XSP.

How transportation contributes to environmental concerns and ways to make it safer as well as cheaper.

Hakin, Simon, Paul Seidenstat and Gary W. Bowman, eds. Privatizing Transportation Systems. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1996, 343p.

Essays focusing on the economics of converting from public to private ownership of airports, highways, mass transit, and ports. Suggests that the financing, construction, maintenance and operation of the means of transportation can be done more efficiently by private sources.

Hayashi, Yoshitsugu and John Roy, eds. Transport, Land-Use and the Environment. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1996, 430p.

Papers from the World Conference on Transport Research Society focus on the effect of transportation on energy conservation and the environment.

Hazard, John L. Managing National Transportation Policy. Westport, CT: Eno Foundation for Transportation, 1988, 164p.

How the first eight Secretaries of Transportation managed national transportation policy.

Johnson, T. L. Commercialization of Space Transportation-Exploring the Impact of the National Space Transportation Policy. Wright Patterson AFB, OH: U. S. Air Force Institute of Technology, 1998, 116p. NTIS order number is ADA 354238INP.

Focuses on investigating the industry and policy commercialization trends. Which led to the establishment of the National Space Transportation policy in 1994 and on compliance with the policy. A policy literature review, case study analysis and interviews were used for the study with an emphasis on participants who have done the most to shape the commercialization policy.

Lewis, David and Fred L. Williams. Policy and Planning as Public Choice: Mass Transit in the United States. Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999, 282p.

Emphasizes the importance of the economic value of transit benefits on local acceptance of budget increases needed to keep mass transit as a core public activity.

McDowell, Bruce, ed. Environmental Consequences of a Reduced Federal Role in Transportation. Lansdowne, VA: Eno Transportation Foundation, Inc., 1997, 69p.

An Eno Policy Forum looks at the issues surrounding the 1997 ISTEA reauthorization that could effect transportation funding and environmental regulation. Sponsored by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency the report notes that highway vehicles account for more than half of the nation’s CO2 emissions and about a third of the total NO and VOC emissions.

McDowell, Bruce D. MPO Capacity: Improving the Capacity of Metropolitan Planning Organizations to Help Implement National Transportation Policies. Washington, DC: U. S. Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1995, 60p. ACIR Report number A-130.

MPO’s are the metropolitan planning organizations responsible for obtaining federal highway, transit and surface transportation funds under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). The report looks at 18 MPO’s serving 12 metropolitan areas of different types.

Mead, Kenneth M. Surface Transportation: Funding Limitations and Barriers to Cross-Modal Decision Making.. Washington, DC: United States General Accounting Office, 1993, 11, [4] p. Report Number GAO/T-RCED-93-25.

The GAO Director of Transportation Issues testifies before the Subcommittee on Transportation of the Senate Appropriations Committee on the implementation of ISTEA. He discusses investment opportunities, demonstration projects, funding flexibility, and the need for improved analytic tools.

Mead, Kenneth M. Surface Transportation: Reorganization, Program Restructuring, and Budget Issues. Washington, DC: U. S. General Accounting Office, 1995, 18p. Report Number GAO/T-RCED-95-103.

The surface transportation units accounted for $ 26 billion in FY 1966 and were the subject of restructuring efforts. Specific issues were DOT reorganization, the grant delivery system, budget issues, mass transit operating and investment funding, and Amtrak’s condition.

Murray, Gail, et al. Strategies to Assist Local Transportation Agencies in Becoming Mobility Managers. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997, 142p. Available from NTIS as order number PB 98-122633XSP.

A U. S. Federal Transit Administration funded report by the Transportation Research Board uses seven case studies to document technical assistance to local transit programs to help them become better managers.

National Academy of Public Administration. Organizing the Administration of Surface Transportation Policies and Programs to Meet National Needs. Washington, DC: National Academy of Public Administration, 1991, 84p.

Provides in-depth analysis of the U. S. department of Transportation’s organization/structure and the feasibility of establishing a Surface Transportation administration within it, cross-modal action, and condition of state DOT’s. Summaries of the laws authorizing surface transportation programs and possible changes are given.

Nijkamp, Peter. Sytze A. Rienstra and Japp M. Vleugel. Transportation Planning and the Future. New York:, J. Wiley, 1998, 297p.

The rise in CO2 emissions indicate that there is a need to make the transportation system more compatible with environmental sustainability. Future conditions are suggested by the use of analytical models.

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Towards Sustainable Transportation. Paris: OECD, 1997, 187p. NTIS order number is OECD 1261XZ

Papers from the March 1996 OECD conference held in Vancouver, Canada highlight the problems of increased transport activity volume and growth upon the environment. Offers a series of Transportation Principles and Strategic Directions for policy makers.

Polak, Jacob B. and Arnold Heertje. Analytical Transport Economics: an International Perspective. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Pub., 2001, 448p.

International in focus, this is a revised version of European Transport Economics (1993). It looks at the role of government after deregulation and at transportation policy in urban environments, transitional economies and the European Union.

Rajan, Sudhir C. The Enigma of Automobility: Democratic Politics and Pollution Control. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996, 203p.

Has chapters on automobile pollution and its regulation. California regulation, risk management and the older vehicle.

Sampson, Roy J., Martin T. Farris, and David I. Domestic Transportation: Practice, Theory and Policy. 6th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1990, 747p.

A standard college text for students of transportation with historical value to special libraries.

Seeley, Bruce E. Building the American highway system: Engineers as policy makers. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1987, 315p.

Presents a detailed history of road building in 19th and 20th century United States and serves as a data source on the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads, the predecessor of the Federal Highway Administration.

Shaw, Stephen J. Transport: Strategy and Policy. Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 1993, 276p.

Examines the strategies of passenger and freight carriers as governments deregulate or privatize transportation. Issues discussed include influence of trade associations on government policy, impact of transportation on the environment, and prevention of traffic congestion.

Smerk, George M. The Federal Role in Urban Mass Transportation. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991, 391p.

Smerk, George M. Urban Mass Transportation: a Dozen Years of Federal Policy. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1974, 388p.

A contemporary look at the early days of DOT, it examines the activities and policies of the agencies that preceded the present day U. S. Federal Transit Administration.

Tolley, Rodney S. Transport Systems, Policy and Planning. New York: Wiley, 1995, 402p.

Looks at transport problems around the world, national systems of transport, urban and rural differences, environmental and social impacts of transportation planning and policy. Surveys how transport planning and policy are formulated in different countries.

Transportation Research Board. Data for Decisions: Requirements for National Transportation Policy Making. Washington, DC: National Research Council, 1992, 168p. NTIS order number is PB 92-140144XSP.

Study commissioned by the U. S. Department of Transportation to determine the availability and quality of national transportation data needed for its decision making. The TRB committee also looked at institutional changes within DOT to ensure a permanent data capability.

Transportation Research Board. Data Resources for National Transportation Decision Making, 1990. Transportation Research Record 1253. Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board, 1990, 99p. NTIS order number is PB 90-267287XSP.

Contains 10 papers on data needs for air and surface passengers, freight, emerging information technology, scenic byways, recreational travel/tourism, safety, transportation decision making, and national transportation strategic planning.

Transportation Research Board. Toward a Sustainable Future: Addressing the Long-Term Effects of Motor-Vehicle Transportation on Climate and Ecology. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997, 261p. NTIS order number is PB 98-102890XSP.

Reports on carbon dioxide buildup, cumulative ecological effects of vehicle emissions and implications for research and policy making.

Transportation Research Board. Transportation System Planning and Applications 1990. Washington, DC: National Research Council, 1990, 188p. NTIS order number is PB 91-178624XSP.

Contains papers on environmental factors in transportation system planning, increasing the capacity of urban highways, Orange County, California activity study, Dulles Airport access corridor, defensible transportation impact fees, selection of planning software packages, etc.

U. S. Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations. Planning Progress: Addressing ISTEA Requirements in Metropolitan Planning Areas. Washington, DC: U.S. Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1997, 81p. NTIS order number is PB 97-144612INZ.

Sponsored by the U. S. Federal highway Administration, this report is part of an overall assessment of the metropolitan planning requirements of the Intermodal Surface transportation efficiency Act. It involved an extensive literature search, over 70 reports from federal review teams and field work with small population planning agencies.

U. S. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment. The National Space Transportation Policy: Issues for Congress. Washington, DC: Office of Technology Assessment, [1995] 114p. NTIS order number is PB 95-262200INZ.

The National Space Transportation Policy designates the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Departments of Commerce, Defense, and Transportation to find and promote innovative arrangements between the U. S. government and the private sector to reduce the cost of getting to space.

U. S. Department of Transportation. ISTEA Reauthorization: Policy Statement and Principles. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1996, 9p.

More than an eighth of America’s economy is devoted to transportation products and services. One in ten Americans is employed in those industries. The Intermodal Surface Transportation Act that provided an investment framework for transportation expired in 1997. This statement outlines some of the major principles that DOT believes should be the basis for the next authorizing bill.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Leading the Way to Transportation Excellence in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 2000, 31p.

DOT Transportation policy statement which includes the brochure "How transportation has changed since 1993".

U. S. Department of Transportation. Moving America 1989-1992: Carrying Forward National Transportation Policy. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept of Transportation, 1993, 33p.

Summarizes the 1989-1992 accomplishments in implementing National Transportation Policy

U. S. Department of Transportation. Moving America: New Directions, New Opportunities: a Statement of National Transportation Policy Strategies for Action. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1990, 129p.

Outlines the national policy agenda to achieve short and long-term transportation needs: maintain and expand the nation’s transportation system; foster a strong financial base; keep the industry strong and competitive; support public safety and national security; protect the environment and quality of life; and advance transportation technology.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Moving America: New directions, New Opportunities. Volume 1: Building the National Transportation Policy. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1989, 41p.

Identifies major concerns of transportation officials: infrastructure, safety, national security, international trade, growth in demand, equity and access, the environment, foreign oil dependence, and budgetary constraints.  

U. S. Department of Transportation. National Transportation Strategic Planning Study. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1990, 533p. NTIS order number is PB 90-231119XSP.

Provides an overview of the U.S. transportation system and identifies future investments needed to maintain and develop the infrastructure.

U. S. Department of Transportation. National Transportation System Initiative: a Progress Report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1996, 58p.

U. S. Department of Transportation. NEXTEA, the National Economic Crossroads Transportation Efficiency Act: Shaping America’s Surface Transportation System for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1997, 42, [5] p.

A six-year, $175 billion investment program to improve America’s highways, bridges, transit systems and railroads, this legislation is intended to increase the emphasis on transportation safety, protect the environment and move people from welfare to work.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Policy Architecture, Transportation Decision Making in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 2000, 40p.

A common decision making framework, a policy architecture, is the result of visioning sessions with public and interest groups from industry, labor, academia, government, citizens and Dot employees that project transportation needs out to the year 2025. It emulates the National Transportation Trends and Choices Report by Secretary of Transportation William T. Coleman that defined choices for transportation from 1975 to the year 2000. See also The Changing Face of Transportation, a companion volume to Policy Architecture.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Regional Roundtable Report and Action Plan: a Progress Report from Our Customers. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1994, 53p.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Serving Rural America: U. S. Department of Transportation Rural Program Guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1999, 32p.

 The purpose of the Rural Transportation Initiative is to ensure that rural areas and small communities share in the mobility as well as the economic and social benefits of DOT programs. Information is provided about grant programs of most direct interest to rural areas.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Statement of U. S. Department of Transportation Research and Development Policy. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1991, 19p.

Mission statement with seven goals: tie America together; invest strategically in transportation infrastructure; create a new alliance between the nation’s transportation and technology industries; promote safe and secure transportation; actively enhance our environment; put people first and transform DOT.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Surface Transportation Research and Development Plan. Volume 1. Report to Congress. Cambridge , MA: Volpe Transportation System Center, 1993, 183p. NTIS order number is PB 94-206745XSP.

Section 6009(b) of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Act (ISTEA) requires DOT to develop a national integrated surface transportation R&D plan for urban, suburban and rural areas. It focuses on research underway or planned by the various units of DOT: Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs; Office of Intermodalism; Federal Highway Administration; National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; Federal Transit Administration; Federal Railroad Administration; Research & Special Programs Administration; and the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Plan was developed by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center in Cambridge, MA.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Surface Transportation Research and Development Plan. Volume 2. Compendium of Program Abstracts. Report to Congress. Cambridge, MA: Volpe Transportation Systems Center, 1993, 287p. NTIS order number is PB 94-206737XSP.

Program abstracts include highlights, ongoing projects, funding levels, schedules with milestones, personnel requirements and listing of published reports.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Surface Transportation Research and Development Plan. 2nd Edition. Cambridge, MA: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1995, vp.

Prepared by the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (U.S.) Office of Strategic Planning and Analysis.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Surface Transportation Research and Development Plan: a Report to Congress. Cambridge, MA: U. S. Department of Transportation, [1996], 3rd edition. vp.

Prepared by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Transportation Strategic Planning and Analysis Office. DOT-T-96-17. A Report of the Secretary of Transportation Pursuant to the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, Section 6009(b), P.L. 102-240.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Surface Transportation Research and Development Plan: a Report to Congress. Cambridge, MA: U. S. Department of Transportation [1997] 4th edition, 220p. NTIS order number is PB 98-124597XSP.

Prepared by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Transportation Strategic Planning and Analysis Office. A Report of the Secretary of Transportation pursuant to the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, Section 6009(b), P.L. 102-240.

U. S. Department of Transportation. U. S. Department of Transportation Research and Development Plan. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1999, 112p. NTIS order number is PB 99-160582.

Examines the separate modal research & development programs within DOT in an attempt to bring bring greater consistency and cohesion through coordinated and integrated R&D. Lists technologies that are likely to improve transportation infrastructure functions and identifies DOT programs that support them. Study was performed by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.

U. S. Department of Transportation. U. S. Department of Transportation Research and Development Plan. 2nd edition. Report to the Congress. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation.. 2000, 224p. NTIS order number is PB 2001-101589XSP.

Focuses on internal planning and internal coordination procedures to obtain higher returns from R&D investments by the various DOT modes. Emphasizes Department wide areas of concern. Safety is stressed as well as the accessibility of transportation to all citizens and making the transportation infrastructure secure.

U. S. Department of Transportation. U. S. Department of Transportation Strategic Plan 1997-2002: a Visionary and Vigilant Department of Transportation Leading the Way to Transportation Excellence in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1997, 102p. NTIS order number is PB 98-169659XSP.

Provides data on the size and scope of the American transportation system, description of DOT, its values, mission and strategic goals. Discusses five strategic goals their expects outcomes, key external factors and performance measures, data capacity relative to measuring results, and program evaluations to be conducted.

U. S. Department of Transportation. U. S. Department of Transportation Strategic Plan 2000-2005: a Visionary and Vigilant Department of Transportation Leading the Way to Transportation Excellence and Innovation in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation, 2000, 108p.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Changing Face of Transportation. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 2000, vp. Available via the Internet from the DOT web site: http://www.bts.gov/transtu/cft/

Emulates the national trends and Choices publication of 1975 by reviewing the past and setting out national transportation goals to be aimed for until the year 2025. Covers: growth; deregulation and intermodalism; safety by mode; globalization; people, energy and the environment; technology; and national security.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Federal Highway Administration. More than Asphalt, Concrete, and Steel. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1997, 52p. Prepared by the Federal Highway Administration Office of Environment and Planning, Publication No. FHWA-PD-97-012.

Examines some environmental projects that were possible under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Act of 1991 involving bicycles, congestion pricing, greener roadsides, historic preservation, noise barriers, uplands and wetlands, wildlife crossings, etc.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy. Improving Transportation for a Maturing Society. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation [1997] vp.

Publication no. DOT-P10-97-01.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Performance Measures Working Group. Setting Goals and Measuring Performance for Transportation Research and Technology Programs. Washington, DC: 1998, 10p.

Assists DOT research organizations in managing programs according to the precepts of the Government Performance and Results Act. How does the research relate to the DOT strategic goals? What are the outcomes and outputs?

U. S. Department of Transportation. Research and Technology Coordinating Council. Effective Global Transportation in the 21st Century: a Vision Document. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1999.

U. S. Department of Transportation. Urban Mass Transportation Administration. .A Statement of U. S. Department of Transportation Research and Development Policy. Moving America: New Directions, New Opportunities. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1991. 19p.

Applies the National Transportation Policy statement to the DOT R&D program. Lists major R&D policy principles, design criteria, and serves as a checklist for program selection and cross modal review of submitted budgets.

U. S. General Accounting Office. Surface Transportation: Research Funding, Federal Role and Emerging Issues.: Report to Congressional Committees. Washington, DC: U. S. General Accounting Office, 1996, 42p. Report number: GAO/RCED-96-233. NTIS order number is PB 97-202873XSP.

Discusses public and private funding for surface transportation research, federal role in research and DOT’s ability to fill it, and issues the transportation community believes should be considered in reauthorizing ISTEA.

U. S. General Accounting Office. Urban Transportation: Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Efforts to Meet Federal Planning Requirements: Report to Congressional Requestors. Washington, DC: U. S. General Accounting Office, 1966, 59p. Report number GAO/RCED-96-200. NTIS order number is PB 97-202832XSP.

Discusses the experiences of metropolitan planning organizations (MPO) in implementing the planning requirements of the Intermodal Surface transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Recommends that DOT develop a standard reporting format for assessing and reporting on the MPO’s compliance with planning requirements so DOT can identify any nationwide deficiency patterns, their underlying causes and determine the extent of progress in meeting requirements.

U. S. National Commission on Intermodal Transportation. Toward a National Intermodal Transportation System. Final Report. Alexandria, VA: National Commission on Intermodal Transportation, 1994, 66p. NTIS order number is PB 95-130993XSP.

Section 5005 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 directed the Commission to recommend ways to speed national conversion to an efficient intermodal system and identify the resources to do it. Emphasizes that not all intermodal problems require federal solutions. Federal policy should support private sector innovations, provide maximum flexibility for state and local officials and not intrude unnecessarily into private sector operations.

U. S. National Science and Technology Council. National Research Agenda for Transportation and Sustainable Communities. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 1999, 13p.

This interagency team found that federal activities supporting transportation sustainability issues are fragmented and that a more strategic interagency systems approach sustainability and global climate change is urgently needed. It supports major related federal programs, including alternative fuels and vehicle technologies, by coordinating those activities with national transportation programs and initiatives.

U. S. National Transportation Policy. Phase 2 Policy Advisory Committee. National Transportation Policy, Phase 2: a Report on the Office of the Secretary: an Interim Report for the Secretary of Transportation. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Transportation, 1990, 62p in vp.

Includes chapters on Framework of NTP Phase 2, Changing role of OST, Positioning the Office of the Secretary of Transportation for the 21st century, and Moving Forward Together.

Vuchic, Vukan R. Transportation for Livable Cities. New Brunswick, NJ: Center for Urban Policy Research, 1999, 352p.

Thesis is that the most livable cities have intermodal systems that balance highway and other transportation modes while providing for bicycles, paratransit and pedestrians. Transportation should be economically efficient, socially sound and environmentally sustainable.

Weiner, Edward. Urban Transportation Planning in the United States: an Historical Overview. Revised and Expanded Edition. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1999, 247p.

Summarizes key events in the evolution of of urban transportation planning. Includes change sin technology, philosophy, processes and institutions as well as legislation, policy, and regulations. Arranged chronologically it includes events such as the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, intelligent vehicle highway systems, MAGLEV, etc.

Whitnah, Donald R. U. S. Department of Transportation: a Reference History. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998, 228p.

Examines the origin of DOT and highlights important events surrounding the modal agencies up to the beginning of the Clinton administration. Includes about 40 pages of biographical sketches of the Secretaries of DOT and the modal Administrators.

Winston, Clifford and Chad Shirley. Alternate Route: Toward Efficient Urban Transportation. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 1998, 126p.

The authors believe that policy makers allowed the private sector to play a leading role in intercity transportation that worked out to the benefit of the travelling public. They advocate that the next step is to let the private sector do the same thing in urban transportation.

Updated 11:29 AM EDT, June 24, 2013



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